Trending Q and A.   Arch Pain and Plantar Fasciitis

Trending Q and A. Arch Pain and Plantar Fasciitis

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Injury to the plantar fascia is a common cause of arch pain. The plantar fascia is the thick, connective tissue which supports the arch on the bottom of the foot. … The muscles of the foot may be strained by overstretching, overuse, overloading, bruising, or being cut by stepping on a sharp object.

A structural imbalance or an injury to the foot can often be the direct cause. …Excessive stretching of the plantar fascia, usually due to over-pronation (flat feet),causes plantar fasciitis. The inflammation caused by the plantar fascia being stretched away from the heel often leads to pain in the heel and arch areas.

A: Pain in the foot when you get out of bed and when you stand after sitting for a while is a classic symptom of plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a thick band that runs along the bottom of the foot from the heel to the ball of the foot. … Inflammation of other tendons may cause similar symptoms.

    1. Avoid shoes with large heels and narrow toe areas.
    2. Maintain a healthy weight.
    3. Stretch before engaging in vigorous exercise.
    4. Practice good foot hygiene.
    5. Always wear footwear when you’re outdoors to protect your feet.Choose comfortable, roomy, and well-cushioned shoes.

When you have plantar fasciitis, you usually feel pain in the bottom of the heel or the arch of the foot. Some people describe the pain as feeling like a bruise or an ache. … With continued walking, the pain may return, but usually goes away after rest.

When you have plantar fasciitis, you usually feel pain in the bottom of the heel or the arch of the foot. Some people describe the pain as feeling like a bruise or an ache. … With continued walking, the pain may return, but usually goes away after rest.

Pain can last for several weeks or months and can range from mild to severe.Plantar fasciitis will likely go away on its own, with rest, but it may take several months or longer to resolve completely.

To reduce the pain of plantar fasciitis, try these self-care tips:
  1. Maintain a healthy weight. Lose weight if you’re overweight or obese to minimize stress on your plantar fascia.
  2. Choose supportive shoes. Avoid high heels. …
  3. Don’t wear worn-out athletic shoes. …
  4. Change your sport. …
  5. Apply ice. …
  6. Stretch your arches.
To treat them:
  1. Wear a cutout heel pad.
  2. Use a custom-made insert (called an orthotic) worn in the shoe.
  3. Wear shoes that fit well and have shock-absorbing soles.
  4. Take over-the-counter pain relievers.
  5. Rest your foot.
  6. Try physical therapy.
  7. If you still have pain, ask your doctor about medical procedures.
A summary of the major categories of pain relief medications follows.
  • Analgesics. …
  • Topical analgesics. …
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). …
  • COX-2 inhibitor. …
  • Opioid analgesics. …
  • Nerve pain medications. …
  • Nerve blocks. …
  • Corticosteroids.

 Patients can wear compression sleeves for plantar fasciitis, such as the foots love Copper Arch Supports. 

To prevent that ‘start-up’ pain, one must stretch. Start by moving and flexing your foot, then from a sitting position place on leg across the other (The legs form a figure ‘4’). Finally, pull back on your toes towards your body and hold the position for 10-20 seconds and repeat several times.  Give the arch a slow  but good stretch

Unlike sturdy shoes, flipflops aren’t good for extensive walking because they offer no arch support, heel cushioning, or shock absorption, according to the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA). Wearers can suffer foot pain due to lack of arch support, tendinitis, and even sprained ankles

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